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Wednesday

Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c

and a few words on women's education in late medieval England.

Thereat woman should have been a bit of everything: a musician and singer, dancer and artist in order to shine in society. Without that knowledge none, even the most beautiful girl, couldn't be any success. Teaching music was a significant component of the education of the women from noble families.

Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c,Pieter Angellis, A Musical Assembly (1719)Pieter Angellis, A Musical Assembly (1719)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c,Bartolomeo Veneto, Lady Playing a LuteBartolomeo Veneto, Lady Playing a Lute (about 1530)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c,Dante Gabriel Rossetti, La GhirlandataDante Gabriel Rossetti, La Ghirlandata (1873)


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Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c,Dirk de Quade van Ravesteyn, Allegory of MusicDirk de Quade van Ravesteyn, Allegory of Music (ca 1600)



Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Thomas Wilmer Dewing, “The Lute”Thomas Wilmer Dewing, “The Lute” (1904)


Male dominance and male monopoly reigned in the educational system in the medieval England, which entirely ignored girls. Very few young ladies went to what could be described as a school, although most of them were homeschooled. The basis of their education was the same everywhere – beside religious studying girls learned to play a musical instrument and to sing, but most importantly – how to keep a successful household for your husband.


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, George Goodwin Kilburne The New SpinetGeorge Goodwin Kilburne (1839-1924), The New Spinet



Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c,J. Gougelet The Music LessonJ. Gougelet (19th century), The Music Lesson



Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Veronica VeroneseDante Gabriel Rossetti, Veronica Veronese (1872)



Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Guitar LessonPierre-Auguste Renoir, Guitar Lesson, 1897


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Thomas Wilmer Dewing, The SpinetThomas Wilmer Dewing, The Spinet (1902)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Carl Wilhelm Holsoe A Lady Playing a Spinet Carl Wilhelm Holsoe (1863-1935), A Lady Playing a Spinet


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Jan Vermeer van Delft, A Lady Seated at a VirginalJan Vermeer van Delft, A Lady Seated at a Virginal, c.1674



However, there were well-educated ladies in England of the 16th century . According to some researchers, they were only 15. Among them - Mary I of England (1516-58), the court ladies -- daughters of Sir Thomas More and the noblemen Anthony Cook, the Duke of Somerset. They were able to read in Greek and Latin languages, fluently speak French and Italian. They could sing, dance, play the lute and spinet. Lady Jane Gray ("The Nine Days' Queen" (1537-53) was famed for her exceptional abilities - at the age of six she learned Latin, Greek, Italian, Spanish and French. A few years later, she became fluent in Hebrew, Chaldean and Arabic.

Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Francois Boucher The Music LessonFrancois Boucher(1703-1770, The Music Lesson


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Sabatini The Music LessonSabatini (18th century) - The Music Lesson


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Pieter Codde, Galant CompanyPieter Codde, Galant Company (1633)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Casimir Van Den Daele Two Women Making MusicCasimir Van Den Daele (1818-1880,) Two Women Making Music


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Francois-Hubert Drouais, Clothilde of France known as Madame Clothilde, queen of SardiniaFrancois-Hubert Drouais, Clothilde of France (1775), known as Madame Clothilde, queen of Sardinia


Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603) had a reputation of a highly educated lady as being a princess she had been getting prepared for ruling the country. Every day for three hours she had been studying history, besides that she'd been learning astronomy, mathematics, logic, philosophy, architecture and poetry. She knew Latin and Greek, spoke French, Spanish, Italian. Queen Elizabeth could talk to several ambassadors from different countries in their own languages at the same time. Nobody could compare to her in the art of writing letters.

Educated women were respected and admired then.
However, in the second half of the 16th century the level of the female education in the country downgraded. After Elizabeth I who valued the educated women, the attitude towards them underwent a significant change: instead of the bygone admiration they have been subjected to scorn.

Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Gabriël Metsu, A Musical PartyGabriël Metsu, A Musical Party (1659)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Gerard ter Borch, The Music LessonGerard ter Borch, The Music Lesson. Around 1670


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Gabriel Metsu, Man and Woman Sitting at the VirginalGabriel Metsu, Man and Woman Sitting at the Virginal


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Louis Gauffier Portrait of Elizabeth VassalLouis Gauffier (1761-1801), Portrait of Elizabeth Vassal


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Eduardo Leon Garrido The SerenadeEduardo Leon Garrido (1856-1949), The Serenade



The disregard for the girls' education was noted even in the Royal family. James I of England (1566-1625) was quite sceptical about women's education: his favourite - Princess Elizabeth - spent outdoors most of the time foxhunting or horse riding with her brother. Her education was limited to the ability to communicate in French and Italian and singing and dancing. Mary II of England (1662–1694) was considered a perfectly educated lady. Although, despite her interest in architecture, gardening, collecting porcelain, embroidery, and poetry, she was quite bad at spelling.
In the National Library of the Hague, Koninklijke bibliotheek, there's a gift edition of the Bible with an inscription made by the hand of the Queen and with a number of spelling errors.

Her younger sister Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland wasn't too different. Her knowledge of history and geography, as well as art and literature, was disappointing. The British historian Christopher Hibbert noted her dull and devoid of emotion speech. She used to liven up when food was being served; also she loved card games and races, and could talk tirelessly about fashion or the vicissitudes of weather. She used her excellent memory exclusively only to memorize the court etiquette. Occupying the highest office in the State, Queen Anne did not completely understand what was happening in the world and in her own kingdom.

Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Marguerite Gerard, a Portrait of a MusicianMarguerite Gerard, a Portrait of a Musician. Before 1803


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Albert Glibert Interior With MusiciansAlbert Glibert (1832-1917), Interior With Musicians


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Jean-Baptiste Greuze, Ann Marie Bezin with GuitarJean-Baptiste Greuze, Ann Marie Bezin with Guitar (1758)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, illiam Holman Hunt - BiancaWilliam Holman Hunt (1827-1910), Bianca.


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Rose-Adelaide Ducreux, Self-Portrait with a HarpRose-Adelaide Ducreux, Self-Portrait with a Harp (ca. 1790)



In the 17th century feudal England gradually turned into a bourgeois state, which affected the educational system in the country.

The first boarding schools for girls from "decent families" opened on the outskirts of London in the early century. They were a supplement to home education for the girls from 5 to 16 years old. By the end of the century private schools appeared in many major cities throughout the country. One year at school cost around £21, sometimes more - depending on the level of the establishment. Sometimes after completing the course the students traveled abroad to learn history, culture and architecture of other countries.

In the medieval universities women were not allowed.

Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Jacob Ochterveldt, The Music LessonJacob Ochterveldt, The Music Lesson (1671)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Gustave Jacquet - The RecitalGustave Jacquet (1846-1909), The Recital


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Jan Verkolje, Elegant CoupleJan Verkolje, Elegant Couple (A Musical Interlude) (1674)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Jan van Bijlert, Le ConcerteJan van Bijlert, Le Concerte (1635-40)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Jan van Bijlert, Le ConcerteJan van Bijlert, Le Concerte (1635-40)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Jan Vermeer van Delft, A Lady Standing at a VirginalJan Vermeer van Delft, A Lady Standing at a Virginal (1670)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, John Michael Wrigh, Lady with a TheorboJohn Michael Wrigh, Lady with a Theorbo (1670)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Frans Moormans The DuetFrans Moormans(1832-1893), The Duet


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Sir Joshua Reynolds, Countess Of EglintonSir Joshua Reynolds, Countess Of Eglinton (1777)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Nicolas Regnier, Divine Inspiration of MusicNicolas Regnier, Divine Inspiration of Music (1640)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Laurent de La Hyre, Allegory of MusicLaurent de La Hyre, Allegory of Music (1649)


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Bartholomeus van der Helst The MusicianBartholomeus van der Helst The Musician 1662


Women and Music in Painting 16-18th c, Jan STEEN, A Young Woman playing a HarpsichordJan STEEN, A Young Woman playing a Harpsichord (1659)


More info: Women's education in early modern Europe By Barbara J. Whitehead (books.google.com)


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9 comments:

  1. Would anyone know where I might be able to find information on J. Gougelet (19th century), The Music Lesson
    Legallsk@yahoo.com
    Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  2. Its the greatest Blog I find about pictures. Thank You very Much.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Its Quite Helpful enough but then some of the painting had definition and the name of the painter >.< but Thanks For This BLOG

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hello...I just happened upon your blog and wondered if you could help me. My name is Christy and I was in the Goodwill the other day and came across a painting and wondered if you could shed any light on it for me. It is on canvas and is absolutely stunning. It appears to be a copy on canvas. It isn't signed by an artist and that surprises me. On the back in ink written on the canvas is what looks like -67 with a scribble I can't make out. I will post it to my blog so you can glance at it. Thanks Christy

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love your collection. I was trying to find a picture online that I cannot quite describe well, and happened to find your site. I am looking for a picture I saw in a book, it is a painting of a young lady trying to make up her mind whether to stay with her muse, or go with her art passion, and art wins out. That is not enough to go on, I know, and I can see the painting in my mind, it looks like the style of Caravagio. Anyway, I got so sidetracked by your paintings that I had to tell you this is the finest collection of paintings with old musical instruments that I have ever seen. They are exquisite, and it is amazing to see instruments we don't even have anymore. Thank you for your work in posting these.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Dear Anonymous, nothing comes up to mind re: the picture of a girl, but thank you so much for your lovely comment!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Searching for a painting "the Rehearsal" by eithr t.santo or t.santos. Young man learning the mandolin, two women watching. Could be 17-18 century european painting. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Margaret A Thompson

    ReplyDelete
  8. Seaching for an old possibly 17-18 century painting The Rehearsal showing a young man holding mandolin, leaning towards score. Two young women also in the picture. Original print purchased in UK.

    ReplyDelete

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